Experimental allocations – FAQs

  1. Does APNIC make allocations for experiments?
  2. How much does an experimental allocation cost?
  3. Part of my research project is private and I do not wish my details to be disclosed. Is this okay?
  4. Can I extend the term of the experimental allocation?
  5. What is an experiment?

Does APNIC make allocations for experiments?

Yes. Please refer to Section 5.7 of the APNIC Internet Number Resource Policies for the full policy statement.

How much does an experimental allocation cost?

You will need to become a member of APNIC to get an experimental allocation. No other fees apply to these allocations. If you are already a member of APNIC, then you do not have to pay anything extra for an experimental allocation. Also, the experimental allocation will not be counted in calculating your membership tier.

Part of my research project is private and I do not wish my details to be disclosed. Is this okay?

You will need to discuss this with APNIC. The intention of these allocations is to encourage experiments that are in the public interest. APNIC will consider your request to not disclose some non-essential elements of your experiment, but if you require any significant restrictions on disclosure then you will not be eligible for an experimental allocation.

Can I extend the term of the experimental allocation?

It is intended that most experiments will be completed within one year. However, if you need more time to complete the objectives set out in the original proposal, then you may request an extension, fully documenting the reasons why more time is needed.

What is an experiment?

An experiment is a project that meets the criteria in either section 5.7.2.1 or 5.7.2.2 of the APNIC Internet Number Resource Policies. That is, if the project is documented in an experimental RFC, or is described document that is available free of charge and publicly accessible in a forum approved by APNIC, it can be considered an experiment.

APNIC may discuss the details of the proposal with the IETF or other standards bodies to determine whether a project is experimental or not.

No projects will be considered as eligible experiments if they are being conducted for commercial purposes or if the results will not be freely available without constraints on their disclosure or use.